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Concrete Slab Bearing Wall MS Class




Concrete Slab Bearing Wall MS Class. Roof Frame Concrete Slab
Upper floors may be of concrete plank, steel deck or wood. Hence, these stiffeners are not required only if the column spacing is less than 5m and floor height is less than 3m. Building loads are light and the framing spans are short. Lateral forces are resisted by wood frame diaphragms and shear walls. There are few, if any, interior walls. Such walls may be much thicker toward the base, where maximum loads accumulate. Arch construction depends essentially on the wedge. Masons use different types of mortar and blocks depending on whether the wall will be beneath or above grade. Corner blocks feature three flat sides to give corners a finished look. Footings require a lot of concrete, so if you’re building long walls, it might be a good idea to hire a contractor to pour the footings.

Add enough water to make the mixture thick but not stiff.

In this segment we cover how to reinforce a block masonry wall from the ground up, including reinforcing steal, grouting a blockConcrete Masonry Details – Concrete Slab Masonry Bearing Wall

Concrete Slab Bearing Wall MS Class. Roof Frame Concrete Slab

Upper floors and roofs are supported by wood or steel joists or trusses. In majority of the building structures, stiffeners would be unavoidable. Masons will start building the wall. Floor and roof framing consists of wood joists or rafters on wood studs spaced no more than 24 inches apart. Floor and roof diaphragms consist of straight or diagonal lumber sheathing, tongue and groove planks, oriented strand board, or plywood. Interior partitions are sheathed with plaster or gypsum board. Wall openings for storefronts and garages, when present, are framed by post-and-beam framing. Floor and roof framing consists of cast-in-place concrete slabs or metal deck with concrete fill supported on steel beams, open web joists, or steel trusses.

Lateral forces are resisted by steel moment frames that develop their stiffness through rigid or semi-rigid beam-column connections. When only selected connections are moment-resisting connections, resistance is provided along discrete frame lines. Diaphragms consist of concrete or metal deck with concrete fill and are stiff relative to the frames. When the interior of the structure is finished, frames are concealed by ceilings, partition walls, and architectural column furring. A filled core column or poured concrete column should be placed fullheight to the belt course (ring beam) at each door jamb. For an 8-inch wall, a minimum 16-inch concrete footing is usually necessary. Additional rods, inserted in the top of the footing while the concrete is still wet, extend into the hollow cores of the blocks.

The footing has to be below frost line and as level as you can make it. The best course is to base wall length on increments of 8 or 16 inches. That will tell you how many block per course. Otherwise, it’s cheaper to buy dry mortar and sand and mix them yourself. The corner blocks alternate courses, so the first layer may have a corner block that runs east-west, and the next course will have a corner block that runs north-south.

It takes some practice to develop the buttering motion. For the inside of the block, put the mortar on the other side of the trowel and repeat the motion. Butter the ends and ease it gently into place.


Lateral forces in the transverse direction are resisted by the rigid frames. Lateral forces in the longitudinal direction are resisted by wall panel shear elements or rod bracing. Diaphragm forces are resisted by untopped metal deck, roof panel shear elements, or a system of tensiononly rod bracing. The floors and roof consist of cast-inplace concrete slabs or metal deck with or without concrete fill. Framing consists of steel beams, open web joists or steel trusses. Lateral forces are resisted by cast-in-place concrete shear walls. Diaphragms consist of concrete or metal deck with or without concrete fill. The floors and roof consist of cast-in-place concrete slabs or metal deck with concrete fill. Walls consist of infill panels constructed of solid clay brick, concrete block, or hollow clay tile masonry. The diaphragms consist of concrete floors and are stiff relative to the walls. Lateral forces are resisted by concrete moment frames that develop their stiffness through monolithic beam-column connections. In older construction, or in regions of low seismicity, the moment frames may consist of the column strips of two-way flat slab systems. Modern frames in regions of high seismicity have joint reinforcing, closely spaced ties, and special detailing to provide ductile performance. This detailing is not present in older construction. Floors are supported on concrete columns or bearing walls. Lateral forces are resisted by cast-in-place concrete shear walls. In more recent construction, shear walls occur in isolated locations and are more heavily reinforced with concrete slabs and are stiff relative to the walls.

The floors and roof consist of cast-in-place concrete slabs. The seismic performance of this type of construction depends on the interaction between the frame and the infill panels. The shear strength of the concrete columns, after racking of the infill, may limit the semiductile behavior of the system. Floor and roof framing consists of wood joists, glulam beams, steel beams or open web joists. Framing is supported on interior steel columns and perimeter concrete bearing walls.

Structural Design of Foundations for the Home Inspector

Concrete Slab Masonry Bearing Wall
Lateral forces are resisted by the precast concrete perimeter wall panels. Wall panels may be solid, or have large window and door openings which cause the panels to behave more as frames than as shear walls.

Floor and roof framing consists of precast concrete planks, tees or double-tees supported on precast concrete girders and columns. Lateral forces are resisted by precast or cast-in-place concrete shear walls. Diaphragms consist of precast elements interconnected with welded inserts, cast-in-place closure strips, or reinforced concrete topping slabs. Wood floor and roof framing consists of steel beams or open web joists, steel girders and steel columns. Lateral forces are resisted by the reinforced brick or concrete block masonry shear walls. Diaphragms consist of straight or diagonal wood sheathing, plywood, or untopped metal deck, and are flexible relative to the walls. Interior bearing walls, when present, also consist of unreinforced clay brick masonry. In older construction, floor and roof framing consists of straight or diagonal lumber sheathing supported by wood joists, which are supported on posts and timbers.

In more recent construction, floors consist of structural panel or plywood sheathing rather than lumber sheathing. The diaphragms are flexible relative to the walls. When they exist, ties between the walls and diaphragms consist of bent steel plates or government anchors embedded in the mortar joints and attached to framing.

In older construction or large, multistory buildings, diaphragms consist of cast-in-place concrete. In regions of low seismicity, more recent construction consists of metal deck and concrete fill supported on steel framing.


Reinforced Masonry Wall

This video shows the sequence of construction of the new reinforced masonry wall system.




Category: Block, Brick Walls, Concrete, Steel
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